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3 tips for leading philanthropic change at your company

Our guest blogger this week is James Temple, Chief Corporate Responsibility Officer at PwC Canada. He provides oversight to ways the firm is embedding social, environmental and economic integrity into the fabric of its business. In 2012, he was named one of the world’s top CSR practitioners by the Centre for Sustainability and Excellence and was an inaugural Notable.ca Young Professional of the Year. He has also been featured in articles and videos for TED, the Globe and Mail, Forbes, Strategy Magazine and Canadian Business. In this Imagine a City post, he gives us tips on how you can lead philanthropic change at your company.

James Temple
Chief Corporate Responsibility Officer
PwC Canada

Our region is home to corporate citizens who are leading innovation across all sectors of our economy. But today’s corporate leaders are about much more than advancing bottom lines, they’re also the engines that drive community building and social change by harnessing the passion and leadership capabilities of their work forces from the inside, out.

As organizational structures evolve, so do the demands of savvy employee brand ambassadors. The landscape of philanthropy and employee fundraising is changing and we need to make a business case for strengthening knowledge and leadership through workplace philanthropy.

Here are a few leading practices that can help you adapt to philanthropic movements within your business:

1. Make philanthropy real and make it relatable 

Each of us can play a role in helping to re-imagine and align philanthropic efforts with our organization’s purpose and your values. Don’t be afraid to share stories about how your personal engagement in philanthropy aligns with your values and has had a positive impact on your leadership journey.

By building community capabilities into your personal brand, you can help to teach others how philanthropy can support better relationship management with teams and clients, enhancing trust between and across teams, the business and community. Philanthropy is accessible and it’s personal.

2. Re-frame conversations around community impact versus dollars raised

There is significant public interest in charitable transparency and increased scrutiny on the amount of money that charities are allocating towards fundraising and administration. We need to find a better proxy to help build trust between employee donors and community agencies who need funding to keep the lights on to do their work.

Studies suggest that people respond better to measures that focus on social impacts—for example, how many lives have been saved as a direct result of donations, or how many children get a healthy breakfast as a direct result of funding a meal program. By communicating progress in this way, we take the pressure of the balance sheet and can go well beyond the ‘fundraising thermometer’ to help rationalize why people should join a community movement.

3. Provide options that make room for time, talent and treasure

People can give back in many ways and effective corporate citizens make room for people to give in a way that’s right for them. Every contribution counts. From empowering people to volunteer to learn more about how a community organization makes a difference, to looking for ways to help people share their professional skills pro-bono, the value of a contribution can be amplified by helping people choose which options are the optimal mix for their personal circumstances. What’s most important? Creating momentum and personal ownership so a person believes they can be the change that they are a part of.

Want to learn more about how PwC and other leading corporate citizens are blazing a trail when it comes to philanthropy in the workplace? Visit United Way’s Keeping Good Company website and follow PwC and United Way on May 16 when PwC will be hosting a conversation in partnership with United Way at the Economic Club of Canada that digs into this very topic.

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