Rethinking Progress:

Growing income inequality and its impact on opportunity

Guest blogger: Frank Graves, President, EKOS Research

Frank Graves, President of EKOS Research -- @VoiceOfFranky

Frank Graves, President of EKOS Research — @VoiceOfFranky

For more than thirty years, Frank Graves has examined and interpreted Canadians’ attitudes on some of the most pressing issues facing our country. As the head of EKOS Research, he has earned a reputation for insightful analysis, thoughtful public policy advice, and hard-hitting media commentary. United Way and EKOS are research partners on a report to be released in 2015 The Opportunity Equation: Building opportunity in the face of growing income inequality, which examines the growing income gap in Toronto, why it matters, and what we can do to improve access to opportunities for all Torontonians.

Amid emerging debate in the Canadian media about the fortunes of the middle class, recent EKOS research suggests that Canadians really do perceive their future prospects negatively. The promise of a better life, security, and the comforts of middle class membership is no longer assumed.

About a decade ago, for the first time, we saw evidence that young Canadians weren’t moving ahead of their parents’ achievements. The incidence of individuals who report having fallen behind their parents’ income at the same period in life grows higher as we move from seniors to boomers to Generation X.

Concern over short-term prospects turns decidedly gloomy as citizens ponder a future where only the smallest number believe the next generation will experience the progress achieved by previous generations. They see growing income inequality as a key factor. The point isn’t that Canada is in a state of economic distress – it clearly isn’t. Rather, the general perception is that the policies and institutions that produced progress and success don’t seem to be working the same way anymore.

But there is a way forward.

EKOS has found that an overwhelming majority of those we have polled want a new blueprint for the country. Canadians believe that a growing and optimistic middle class matters to societal progress, and they also want action to create these conditions again. And, importantly they want all elements of Canadian society to take part – from governments, to academics, to NGOs like United Way, to individual citizens – all of whom can play a role in a return to progress and prosperity.