Women who lead

It’s International Women’s Day! To celebrate, we put together a list of some awesome women who inspire us. These remarkable individuals live right here in the GTA—leading the charge on changing lives and making our community a better place to live each and every day.

1. Maayan Ziv, 27 | CEO & Founder of Access Now

What started as her Master’s thesis project at Ryerson University has grown into an internationally crowd-sourced app that maps more than 16,000 locations spanning 32 countries, telling users whether they’re accessible—or not. Access Now, an app that maps the accessibility (or lack thereof) of locations like bars, stores, coffee shops and train stations, isn’t just for people with disabilities. “Whether you sprain your ankle and are on crutches for a couple weeks, or you want to go somewhere with a grandparent who uses a walker, we all have a relationship with accessibility,” says Maayan, who lives with muscular dystrophy. “Maybe you’re a new parent with a stroller—you’ll suddenly see the subway system differently because you realize only half the stations are accessible.”

2. Ceta Ramkhalawansingh | Retired civil servant, active volunteer

As a 19-year-old undergrad in 1970, Ceta became a driving force behind the creation of a Women’s Studies program at the University of Toronto. From there, the immigrant from Trinidad and Tobago devoted her career to fighting for social justice and human rights at City Hall, where she worked for 30 years championing causes like breastfeeding on city grounds, zero tolerance for racial profiling in policing and better access to social housing. As a councillor for Ward 20 in 2014, she put forward a motion to change the words of “O Canada” to be more inclusive, and in 2015 she co-founded the Campaign for Gender Equality in the Senate, urging the PM to fill 22 vacant seats with women. Today, when she’s not spearheading efforts to revitalize Grange Park, she’s volunteering at her alma mater as an honorary member of the Women and Gender Studies Institute.

3. Crystal Sinclair, 53 | Social Worker

“Most of my work involves empowering others, particularly the Indigenous community.” Crystal founded the Toronto chapter of Idle No More to protect Indigenous rights and, as a social worker, has worked with women and Indigenous men in the shelter system, as well as with homeless youth at Covenant House. She’s currently a board member with FoodShare,  a United Way-supported agency, where she assists Northern communities to help make fresh food accessible and affordable.

Want to meet more inspiring, changemaking women? Head over to Local Love—your guide to living well and doing good.

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