Putting mental health on the agenda

Photo of Steve Lurie Executive Director of the Canadian Mental Health AssociationSteve Lurie is the Executive Director of the CMHA Toronto, a post he has held since 1979. Steve is a strong voice for improved services for individuals living with mental health challenges. In 2016, he was appointed as a Member of the Order of Canada, recognizing his contributions as a leading advocate and administrator in the field of mental health care.

On May 4 the Canadian Mental Health Association joined community organizations across the GTA for the launch of Ontario for All, a new alliance convened by United Way that’s working together this provincial election campaign to highlight five priorities that we believe are critical to a fair, equitable and prosperous Ontario.

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Investing in inclusive, healthy communities with affordable and quality childcare and public education pharmacare and dental programs, transit and transportation, and community programs and services is an essential goal in our 5-point Call to Action.

Mental health is just one component of health in our communities. But as Canadian Mental Health Association branches across the country participate in Mental Health Week— an opportunity to promote awareness about mental illness, mental health and the supports we all need access to — it’s very much top of mind.

What should also be in the spotlight is the direct connection between poor health — mental and physical — and poverty.

In 2013 the CMA (Canadian Medical Association) published a report that showed that only 25% of a person’s health status is attributable to their access to health care. 50% is determined by the social determinants of health such as:  income, early child development, food security, employment, housing, race, aboriginal status and community belonging. The Hamilton Spectator/ McMaster collaboration Code Red which examined poverty in Hamilton showed a 21-year life expectancy gap between low and high income neighborhoods.

The CMA called for government action on: a poverty reduction action plan, a guaranteed annual income, affordable and supportive housing, development of a food security program, more investments in early childhood education, including parental support, collaboration between government and industry on a pharmacare program, and a comprehensive strategy for First Nations Health.

Around the world, cities are starting to work together to promote mental health and well-being. Strategies include: early intervention, closing treatment gaps, partnering with local citizens, neighborhoods, the corporate sector and fostering innovation.

Taken together, action on these fronts will result in healthier communities, reduced pressures on hospitals and improved quality of life for all of Ontario’s citizens — regardless of means. That’s the kind of province that the organizations behind Ontario for All envision, and that’s why we’re working together for a healthier Ontario.

Join us. Put healthy communities on the agenda in your own neighbourhood this election: ask candidates how they’re investing in healthy communities when you attend a local debate or they come knocking at your door.

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