4 Women making local issues #UNIGNORABLE

It’s International Women’s Day—the perfect time to celebrate some of the amazing women who are working hard to improve the lives of individuals and families across Greater Toronto. Whether they’re tackling #UNIGNORABLE issues like homelessness and human trafficking, or raising awareness about poverty and bullying, each of these women is strengthening our region. Their dedication, determination and love for community will inspire you to get out there and show your local love, too.

1. Aiko Ito, Client intervention worker at Dixon Hall Neighbourhood Services

As a client intervention worker at United Way-supported agency Dixon Hall, Aiko Ito advocates for Toronto seniors who face housing instability. She primarily helps seniors living on a low income who have physical or cognitive disabilities or mental health and addiction issues—and leads them out of a crisis in their current housing situation. Whether the issue is accessibility, rent hikes, conflict with neighbours or threat of eviction, Ito’s goal remains the same: “To help people live safely, both emotionally and physically.”

2. Edna Toth, founder and Editor-in-chief of Tough Times

Six years ago, Edna Toth launched Tough Times , a social justice tabloid newspaper currently circulating 10,000 copies six times a year to people in Peel Region. Since it’s launch, the paper has been praised for bringing attention to the affordable housing crisis in the region—and for giving a platform to people who rarely have the chance to speak about their lived experience with poverty and homelessness. “We’re representing people who don’t have any opportunity to say anything,” says Toth. “They often have nothing. They don’t have a place to speak in except Tough Times.”

3. Constable Joy Brown, Peel Regional Police

Photo courtesy of Bryon Johnson & The Brampton Guardian.

Const. Joy Brown, a 28-year veteran officer, is not the type of person to take all the credit. She stresses that it was the combined work of multiple Peel region organizations that made a big, collective step forward in the fight against human trafficking back in 2016 when more than 22 groups, including community, law enforcement, and medical service providers, joined to create the Human Trafficking Protocol. Essentially, the protocol, which Brown helped develop, provides a streamlined support process for trafficking survivors, linking support groups under one umbrella. Two years on, the protocol—and the cooperation it brings—has been transformational.

4. Hannah Alper, social issues speaker

While Hannah, 15, writes about a range of topics from green living to bullying on her popular blog, Call Me Hannah , she’s perhaps best known for her moving speeches on social issues, including a TED talk. She’s also a bit of hero in her own community, where she received a student success award from the York Region District School Board for rallying her school to get involved in an international clean water campaign and local recycling program. While her accomplishments are huge, Hannah is a proponent of making small, everyday changes. “Know that it’s the little things that add up to make a big difference,” she asserts.

Want to meet more inspiring, change-making women? Head over to Local Love —your guide to living well and doing good.

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