Access to food during COVID-19

The current crisis magnifies a reality: times like this push our most vulnerable to their limits, and beyond. It’s also impacting their ability to meet their basic needs, like accessing nutritious food. To help unpack the impact of COVID-19 on individuals and families across the GTA, and the underlying systemic issues that contribute to food inaccessibility, United Way Greater Toronto President and CEO Daniele Zanotti engaged experts in a virtual conversation. Panellists Paul Taylor, Executive Director of  FoodShare, Kate Greavette, Executive Director of York Region Food Network, and  Adaoma Patterson, Manager, Poverty Reduction Initiatives & Community Engagement at Region of Peel, discussed how access to food is impacted during the current crisis.

Working with frontline agencies to address food insecurity 

Lack of access to food is a pressing emerging need reported by United Way Greater Toronto’s frontline agencies, and by the groups the organization co-chairs with the City of Toronto and our co-ordinated partnerships in the 905, including Peel and York. It is also the reason behind the majority of calls to United Way-funded 211. “Between April 1 and April 8, 211 referred 2,700 callers to local food banks,” said Daniele Zanotti, President and CEO of United Way Greater Toronto. To address the need, United Way provided flexible funding to our agencies so that they can respond to emerging needs caused by COVID-19, including access to food.  

Providing meals to food insecure individuals and families in York Region 

To address increased food demand in York, York Region Food Network (YRFN) has shifted all of its resources towards food access. The organization takes a systemic approach to addressing food insecurity by raising public awareness around issues that impact people’s access to food, like affordable housing, adequate employment and accessible childcare. YRFN has a variety of interventions, from supporting access to food right now to offering a weekly breakfast every Tuesday. “The requests are coming from people from all backgrounds, from Vaughan to Markham to Georgina,” says Kate  Greavette, Executive Director of YRFN. YRFN is also working on providing food to seniors who are experiencing various illnesses and aren’t able to leave their homes.  

Improving economic opportunities to increase access to food 

Adaoma Patterson—Manager of Poverty Initiatives with United Way co-chaired Peel Poverty Reduction Committee (PPRC)—reported witnessing a sense of urgency as a result of COVID-19. “Our priorities were always around economic opportunities and the types of jobs people have access to,” she said. According to Patterson, what the current crisis has magnified for the Committee is that people in entry-level and precarious jobs are particularly vulnerable. “We’re seeing the safety net in our system being tested significantly. We’re seeing who is falling through the cracks.” Patterson stressed the need to think about what else food insecure individuals might need. “When people need food, it’s often that they need a meal plus other things.”

Addressing barriers to food security 

Paul Taylor, Executive Director of  FoodShare, a United Way-supported agency, also stressed the need to address systemic issues that lead to food insecurity. “The biggest challenge is that we’ve got a recipe for hunger and poverty. We have low minimum wages that lead to poverty and we have high housing costs. All of those factors contribute to 4 million people being food insecure,” he said. To address food insecurity, FoodShare recognizes the need for interventions like affordable child care, affordable housing and income that supports the right to food. “We’ve got people who are food insecure and we really want to help them,” he added. 

You can watch the full webinar below. Look out for invitations to future webinars that will help unpack the impact of your support on the most vulnerable in our community.


SUPPORT UNITED WAY’S LOCAL LOVE FUND

Your gift to United Way Greater Toronto’s Local Love Fund will help friends and neighbours access life’s essentials during this challenging time. Donate now.


Working collaboratively during COVID-19

COVID-19 is pushing our social safety net to its limits. Now, more than ever, we are being asked to address community needs in new and different ways in a situation that is changing day to day, sometimes even hour to hour. We’re only just beginning to understand the long-term impact this crisis will have on the social infrastructure so many of our most vulnerable rely on. To help unpack the impact of COVID-19, Daniele Zanotti, United Way Greater Toronto’s president and CEO, joined Denise Campbell from City of Toronto, Ruth Crammond from United Way Greater Toronto and Maureen Fair from West Neighbourhood House in a virtual conversation. Here’s what the panellists shared about what they are seeing on the ground and how working collaboratively is ensuring a fast response: 

Thinking differently through flexible funding and collaborations 

These unprecedented times require a different way of thinking. And that includes how we support our agencies. “We were the first ones out of the gate to provide flexible funding to front-line agencies in Peel, Toronto and York, so they can do what they do best—meet emerging needs as they see fit,” said Daniele Zanotti. Collaboration is also key to meeting urgent needs quickly. Examples? Partnering with the City of Toronto to connect United Way’s network of community agencies to the city’s emergency response plan through community clusters, working with York region on COVID-19 community coordination and working with the region of Peel on action tables on food, domestic violence and seniors. The recent announcement of partnering with the federal government on emergency funding for seniors across the country will also ensure our most vulnerable seniors are cared for.  

Acting fast by thinking locally  

Denise Campbell, the executive director, social development, of the City of Toronto, believes it’s important to think local. “Together in our discussions with United Way and the City of Toronto, we’ve certainly recognized that many of the issues that are facing Torontonians right now require a local response, even if it requires a systemic thinking,” she said. Creating clusters within the city’s coordination plan has allowed staff from United Way and the city to better connect to local front-line agencies, flag any issues they’re seeing and build quick solutions by bringing resources to the table. “It’s this on-the-ground local solutioning that is allowing us to move much faster to respond to local needs,” said Denise.  

Prioritizing the well-being of front-line workers and the most vulnerable 

“In times of crisis, we have to think about a phased response,” said Ruth Crammond, vice president of community investment and development at United Way Greater Toronto. That means prioritizing the safety of front-line workers. Working with public health and United Way’s network of agencies, efforts are being made to keep staff who are delivering services safe, especially those who are working with the homeless population. Ruth also cites the unlikely collaborations that are happening as a result of working through community clusters. For example, a food bank in Scarborough that people can’t access has partnered with a Meals on Wheels delivery service that is dropping food hampers to seniors and families who might be isolated.  

Ensuring the safety of staff and their families 

“Our staff are frightened about what COVID could mean to their personal health,” said Maureen Fair, executive director of West Neighbourhood House. “More importantly, they’re worried about transmitting to their household members.” Maureen shares that because front-line workers are as exposed to risk as healthcare workers, their team is working with healthcare workers to try to understand each others’ needs. “Our staff are scared but I think one of the definitions of bravery and courage is that even when you are scared, you continue to do it.”

You can watch the full webinar below. Look out for invitations to future webinars that will help unpack the impact of your support on the most vulnerable in our community.


SUPPORT UNITED WAY’S LOCAL LOVE FUND

Your gift to United Way Greater Toronto’s Local Love Fund will help friends and neighbours access life’s essentials during this challenging time. Donate now.


A community response to COVID-19

United Way Greater Toronto President and CEO Daniele Zanotti shares his thoughts on why now, more than ever, it’s important we come together as a community to support our most vulnerable friends and neighbours.

These are challenging and uncertain times. But the research is clear and consistent. Community matters. Especially in times of crisis, the stronger the sense of connection—local people working together—the more resilient the community.
 
And we are resilient. We are a community that cares about each other. We at United Way see it every year. Call it an uprising of care. People like you showing local love. Donating, volunteering, all so the place where you live and work is great—for all.

COVID-19 is putting our community’s most vulnerable people in an extremely challenging situation. Those who already face significant barriers, including poverty, homelessness and social isolation, need even more of our help during this time. This crisis may last weeks or months. And we need our social infrastructure—that invisible network of agencies people visit, call and rely on every day in your neighbourhood—to be in place now and in the future. 

As the largest investor in social services next to government, we’re working closely with United Way’s front-line agencies to identify the gaps, needs, trends and opportunities that may be emerging locally. 

We’re helping them navigate change, and offering them flexible funding so they can do what they do best: meet urgent needs for people. These front-line United Way community agencies are working in new ways to ensure that those who are most vulnerable in our communities have access to the critical supports they need, close to home. 

Across the GTA, we’re working with the City of Toronto, Peel Region and York Region to continue connecting our network of more than 270 agencies to deliver emergency response plans. These targeted steps will continue the important work United Way and our network of front-line community service agencies deliver every day to support people experiencing poverty in the GTA.  

And beyond the GTA, across the province, local United Ways are working hard to support local needs. Helping that mom and dad, both working part time gigs, keep food on the table. Reaching out to that youth struggling with mental illness. Making sure the personal support worker can visit your frail 92-year-old neighbour. The need for support, close to home, has never been so vital. The need for community so clear. 

And people have been reaching out, asking what they can do.  

  • First take care of yourself and your family. Take a moment to connect with your community. Call your elderly neighbour, video-chat with a friend who lives alone, email someone who may be isolated.  
  • Reach out to your local United Way to find out how our network of services and programs are helping people in your community. Ask if and how you can volunteer. 
  • If you need help yourself, call 211: a phone line that can connect you to the right information and local community services.

Because in times like these, people matter.  All people. And community matters. The caring ties that connect and bind us.  All of us. In a united way.

This article originally appeared on Toronto.com.


SUPPORT UNITED WAY’S LOCAL LOVE FUND

Your gift to United Way Greater Toronto’s Local Love Fund will help friends and neighbours access life’s essentials during this challenging time. Donate now.


The workplace has changed…

Our guest bloggers this week are Daniele Zanotti, President & CEO of United Way Toronto & York Region and Elizabeth Mulholland, CEO of the national charity, Prosper Canada.

Growing income volatility is causing tough financial challenges and mounting stress for millions of Canadians, according to a new report by TD Bank Group. TD’s research found that unpredictable and variable income is associated with lower overall financial health for those affected, as well as lower financial confidence and increased financial stress.

Income fluctuations are tied to the rise of precarious employment in the changing labour market, as highlighted in United Way Toronto and York Region’s ongoing research. It shows that nearly half of all workers in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA) are facing this new reality of precarious work. These workers are more likely to experience irregular income, suffer more anxiety, and have more difficulty making ends meet. This, in turn, undermines their family, work and social relationships and overall quality of life.

While the labour market has changed, our employment laws and income security policies have been slow to adapt. Most of these policies were developed at a time when standard, full-time permanent jobs were the norm, and they haven’t undergone major changes since.

A changing labour market doesn’t have to be a bad thing. To make it work for everyone though, we need a coordinated response by government, labour, employers and community organizations to ensure that those who are most vulnerable receive the supports and protections they need and policies are in place to mitigate negative impacts on people, households, businesses and communities.

This is why the Government of Ontario’s imminent response to the Changing Workplaces Review Final Report is so timely and critical. Keeping our labour markets dynamic and flexible, while also supporting people engaged in non-standard employment, requires new policy and institutional approaches.

Finding the right balance between competitiveness and job stability, and between the needs of employers and workers will not be easy. But Canadian employers have shown interest in learning more about the impacts of this new reality for their workers and are already engaged in discussions with organizations like United Way, KPMG and Prosper Canada to understand how businesses can also contribute to and benefit from a more secure workforce.

We are at an important crossroads for Ontario and leadership from all sectors is critical to building the momentum and support needed to modernize our employment standards and practices. If we can build consensus, work together, and move forward with purpose, we can get at the root causes of growing income volatility and reduce its financial and human toll on individuals, families, communities and our economy.

We look forward to the Government of Ontario’s proposed legislation later this year and a thoughtful, balanced agenda that builds inclusive prosperity for all Ontarians. With the right policies, we can help our businesses to thrive, while also enabling Ontarians to achieve the financial stability they seek and the ability, once again, to plan for and invest in the future they want for themselves and their families.

It will take all of us working together to develop a labour market that works for everyone, and we encourage the provincial government to exercise its leadership on this issue and set Ontario on the right course.

We asked our CEO these 3 questions…

Community. It’s at the heart of what we do. And for our President and CEO, Daniele Zanotti, it’s the reason why we work every single day to create an “uprising of care” that supports the people in the places where we live and work.

Watch the video below to hear Daniele’s answers to three questions that are close to his heart.

Stay tuned on Imagine a City to hear more from our CEO—and don’t forget to submit your own questions that Daniele can answer on our blog over the coming months.