3 tips for leading philanthropic change at your company

Our guest blogger this week is James Temple, Chief Corporate Responsibility Officer at PwC Canada. He provides oversight to ways the firm is embedding social, environmental and economic integrity into the fabric of its business. In 2012, he was named one of the world’s top CSR practitioners by the Centre for Sustainability and Excellence and was an inaugural Notable.ca Young Professional of the Year. He has also been featured in articles and videos for TED, the Globe and Mail, Forbes, Strategy Magazine and Canadian Business. In this Imagine a City post, he gives us tips on how you can lead philanthropic change at your company.

James Temple
Chief Corporate Responsibility Officer
PwC Canada

Our region is home to corporate citizens who are leading innovation across all sectors of our economy. But today’s corporate leaders are about much more than advancing bottom lines, they’re also the engines that drive community building and social change by harnessing the passion and leadership capabilities of their work forces from the inside, out.

As organizational structures evolve, so do the demands of savvy employee brand ambassadors. The landscape of philanthropy and employee fundraising is changing and we need to make a business case for strengthening knowledge and leadership through workplace philanthropy.

Here are a few leading practices that can help you adapt to philanthropic movements within your business:

1. Make philanthropy real and make it relatable 

Each of us can play a role in helping to re-imagine and align philanthropic efforts with our organization’s purpose and your values. Don’t be afraid to share stories about how your personal engagement in philanthropy aligns with your values and has had a positive impact on your leadership journey.

By building community capabilities into your personal brand, you can help to teach others how philanthropy can support better relationship management with teams and clients, enhancing trust between and across teams, the business and community. Philanthropy is accessible and it’s personal.

2. Re-frame conversations around community impact versus dollars raised

There is significant public interest in charitable transparency and increased scrutiny on the amount of money that charities are allocating towards fundraising and administration. We need to find a better proxy to help build trust between employee donors and community agencies who need funding to keep the lights on to do their work.

Studies suggest that people respond better to measures that focus on social impacts—for example, how many lives have been saved as a direct result of donations, or how many children get a healthy breakfast as a direct result of funding a meal program. By communicating progress in this way, we take the pressure of the balance sheet and can go well beyond the ‘fundraising thermometer’ to help rationalize why people should join a community movement.

3. Provide options that make room for time, talent and treasure

People can give back in many ways and effective corporate citizens make room for people to give in a way that’s right for them. Every contribution counts. From empowering people to volunteer to learn more about how a community organization makes a difference, to looking for ways to help people share their professional skills pro-bono, the value of a contribution can be amplified by helping people choose which options are the optimal mix for their personal circumstances. What’s most important? Creating momentum and personal ownership so a person believes they can be the change that they are a part of.

Want to learn more about how PwC and other leading corporate citizens are blazing a trail when it comes to philanthropy in the workplace? Visit United Way’s Keeping Good Company website and follow PwC and United Way on May 16 when PwC will be hosting a conversation in partnership with United Way at the Economic Club of Canada that digs into this very topic.

Changemakers to watch: Michael Braithwaite

Meet Michael Braithwaite. He’s a passionate champion who’s made it his life’s work to ensure young people facing barriers have every opportunity for a promising future. As the Executive Director of 360°kids, he’s not only providing a safe haven for at-risk youth, he’s pursuing innovative, out-of-the-box ideas to tackle homelessness in York Region.

MichaelBraithewaite

Michael Braithwaite
Executive Director, 360°kids

WHO: Michael has a long history is the social services sector. Before taking the lead at 360°kids, a United Way–supported agency, he spent over two decades with the YMCA—spearheading everything from day camps in Niagara Region to a men’s shelter in downtown Hamilton and employment programming in Toronto’s Jane and Finch neighbourhood. But as a father of three, Michael is especially drawn to the youth demographic. “My kids look no different than the young people that I work with everyday,” he says. “I like working with youth because they have so much to offer. If they matter to just one person, that can be the hope they need to turn their life around.”

WHY: In March, 360°kids was named “Best Non-Profit” at the Richmond Hill Chamber of Commerce 2016 Business Awards. And with good reason. Thanks to a partnership with the Regional

Michael and his daughter, Irene, following the 360° Experience.

Michael and his daughter, Irene, following the 360° Experience.

Municipality of York, 360°kids is operating out of a new 20,000-square-foot facility in Richmond Hill, increasing its youth drop-in capacity. Prior to the expansion, there were only 27 shelter beds dedicated to youth throughout the rapidly-growing region. “Housing is a major issue in York Region, especially for young people who are experiencing issues at home,” explains Michael. “These crucial spaces allow youth to live semi-independently while accessing the supports they need to get back on their feet.”

Michael celebrates 360°kids' award for "Best Non-Profit" at the Richmond Hill Chamber of Commerce 2016 Business Awards.

Michael celebrates 360°kids’ award for “Best Non-Profit” at the Richmond Hill Chamber of Commerce 2016 Business Awards.

It’s an issue Michael knows well—because it hits close to home. For years, his sister struggled with addiction and mental health issues, and, at just 16, found herself in and out of precarious housing. “It can happen to anyone and any family,” says Michael. “This cause drives me because if my sister had access to an organization like 360°kids growing up, she might have broken that pattern a long time ago.”

But Michael’s impact is more than just bricks-and-mortar improvements. His team has also been the brains behind 360° Experience, which invites business and community leaders to experience a day in the life of homeless youth—braving the cold, hunger and isolation. “I wanted to do something that really has an impact,” he says. “You might only endure these struggles for one day, but it’s an experience that will last a lifetime.”

Michael and Phil Dawson, Fire & EMS Chief, East Gwillimbury, struggle to keep warm during the 360° Experience.

Michael and Phil Dawson, Fire & EMS Chief, East Gwillimbury, struggle to keep warm during the 360° Experience.

WHAT’S NEXT: Drawing on innovative ideas from across the globe, Michael is now piloting a preventative program—in partnership with Raising the Roof—that will see outreach workers visiting schools to identify early signs of struggle that could lead to homelessness. He’s also working to create the first LGBTQ youth shelter in York Region, and plans to have 360°kids become the first Night Stop-accredited agency in Canada—a UK-based program that matches individuals and families who have space in their home to young people in need. “It would only cost $4,000 a year to place a child in an actual home—whether it’s a couple whose grown children have moved out or a senior who feels isolated and could use some extra help around the house,” he explains. “It would be beneficial to both parties, and the best part: a child would have a real place to call home.”

GOOD ADVICE:

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Your social media cheat sheet: February edition

Good_Act_to_Follow_HomePage_SlideWe know you care about the big issues. Things like poverty, youth unemployment and neighbourhood inequality.

That’s why we do our best here at Imagine a City to keep you up-to-date with the latest on social issues that affect us all—and what we’re doing to tackle these challenges.

A big part of this discussion happens online—right here on our own blog and in countless other social media forums where community partners, thought leaders, journalists and other influencers weigh in on important issues.

Here’s our list of some of our favourite blogs, websites and social media accounts we think are worth checking out.

1. Sara Mojtehedzadeh (@SaraMojtehedz)

Sara Mojtehedzadeh

Sara Mojtehedzadeh
Work & Wealth Reporter, Toronto Star

Are you in-the-know when it comes to poverty and labour issues in our community? If so, Sara Mojtehedzadeh probably has something to do with it. The Toronto Star Work and Wealth reporter is a leading authority on precarious employment and equity issues across the province—and a total must-follow on Twitter. We’re a huge fan of Sara because of her tireless efforts to give some of the most vulnerable residents in our community a voice and because she’s a champion of change. She’s also helped shine a light on our groundbreaking research into precarious employment that revealed more than 40% of people in the Hamilton-GTA experience some degree of insecurity in their work. “It’s important to acknowledge how absolutely fundamental work is not just to income and wealth, but to our sense of purpose, identity and well being,” Sara explained in a recent interview with the Canadian Media Guild. And with a background in conflict and peace studies and comparative politics, it’s evident that covering the work and wealth beat is more than just a job for Sara—it’s her passion.

2. Kwame McKenzie: Wellesley Institute blog

Dr. Kwame McKenzie

Kwame McKenzie
CEO, Wellesley Institute

How are health and poverty related? Kwame McKenzie, CEO of the Wellesley Institute, and a regular blogger for the organization, recently wrote this compelling post on the importance of ensuring everyone has equal access to healthcare, regardless of the barriers they face. Kwame is also a United Way board trustee and a CAMH psychiatrist who is considered a leading expert on the social causes of mental illness, suicide and the development of effective, equitable health systems. He argues that socioeconomic challenges such as income inequality, poor housing, stress and access to nutritious food drive disparities in health, making it more difficult for low-income individuals to be healthy and to access health services. Kwame believes that all three levels of government and multiple partners across the city need to work together to ensure that health and policy go hand-in-hand.

3. Furniture Bank (@furniture_bank)

Furniture Bank

We think Furniture Bank is a really great example of an innovative social enterprise. This socially-driven business, supported by United Way, helps individuals and families who are newcomers or are transitioning out of homelessness or abusive situations turn a new house into a home by providing furniture at no cost. It also provides training and work opportunities to people facing barriers to employment. Visit Furniture Bank’s Instagram account for photos of funky furniture items they receive for donation and inspiring stories of lives changed—including one Syrian refugee family whose home was furnished just in time for the holidays.

Want to learn more about social enterprise? Then be sure to check out the upcoming Social Enterprise Toronto Conference on March 10.

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