How to help your young adult land their first job

Parents who want to support their kids in their first job hunt may be tempted to think back to lessons learned from their own moms and dads. This might elicit eye rolls and audible sighs from your 20-somethings—and they’d be justified. According to Timothy Lang, CEO and president of Youth Employment Services (YES), the job market has changed drastically since you started your career.

“There are fewer jobs, and many employers are only offering part-time or contract positions,” says Lang. Young people will have to change jobs many times throughout their careers as a result. And even securing a position in the first place is often more challenging than it was in the past.

But there are several ways that parents can help their children set themselves up for job-hunting success. Here’s how.

1. Support experimentation

Encourage youth to “cast a wide net” when thinking about where to start their career, Lang suggests. Young job seekers should explore options that they may not have considered in the past, even in areas that they don’t initially find interesting. “We have seen thousands of examples where people end up having very fulfilling careers in areas they did not know they would even enjoy,” says Lang. And, he continues, even if that experimentation doesn’t lead to a career, the skills and experience gained will help when looking for the next job.

2. Help them understand their skills

One of the biggest missteps for those new to the workforce is not understanding how their previous experience could relate to the job they want. As a result, many young people stumble when writing their resumés. They may not realize that retail experience, for example, provides them with soft skills, including communication and customer service, which are attractive to employers of all kinds. “Youth today are also very adaptable, and that’s a huge benefit for those coming into a workforce where they will constantly need to upgrade their skills and knowledge,” says Lang. “Parents can help them articulate these attributes on resumés and in interviews.”

3. Restrain yourself

Don’t be overzealous in your desire to help or protect your adult children, though. Lang says occasionally he’s seen parents go so far as to attend job interviews with their kids. “That never ends well,” he says.

4. Stay positive

This is, perhaps, the most important way you can support your young job hunter. While putting out 30 resumés and receiving rejections for all of them can be incredibly discouraging, parents can help youth see the big picture. “At the end of the day, yes, people want experience from a new hire. But they really want people that will fit in well, are positive and have a good work ethic. I have personally hired people who sometimes have less experience, but show they are good team players and learn quickly,” says Lang.

If the young person in your life need help with their job hunt, look to resources like Youth Employment Services. YES has career counsellors available, skill-building workshops and even a job development team that helps youth find employment. And check out Canada’s Top 100 Employers’ annual list of the country’s top employers for young people.

5 reasons why employment reform matters

Job insecurity has become a hot-button issue in today’s rapidly changing labour market. In fact, we know from our research that almost half of all workers in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area are working in some degree of precarious employment. This has a major impact on the wellbeing of individuals and their families, trapping them in a cycle of insecure employment that makes it difficult to move into better opportunities. The soon-to-be released Changing Workplaces Review is a chance to further spark conversation around this vital issue and to highlight the importance of employment reform and its impact on individuals, families, communities and businesses across our region. Here are five reasons why employment reform matters.

1. The labour market has changed—and we need to keep pace: Job insecurity has been rising while stable employment has been eroding since the 1970s. Keeping our labour markets dynamic and flexible, and at the same time, supporting workers outside of standard employment, requires new approaches to policies and institutions. Other jurisdictions in the U.S. and Australia have already taken action to give people in precarious jobs better protection and more options for building a good life. For example, New York City extended paid leave for most employees in workplaces of 5 or more and unpaid leave for most people in workplaces of 1-4 workers. Our region is ready to step up to meet these challenges head-on in order to achieve a balance between our social and economic objectives.

2. It helps level the playing field for our region’s most vulnerable individuals: A community is only as strong as the sum of its parts. In this new labour market, the most vulnerable workers are often those that are impacted the most negatively. People who are precariously employed experience penalties that others in stable, secure jobs don’t face. For example, many precarious workers aren’t formally recognized as employees, and aren’t protected by the Employment Standards Act. And only 12 per cent of those in precarious employment are paid if they miss a day’s work. It’s these workers who need the most protection. Employment reform will bring us one step closer to giving these individuals a fair chance at a good life.

3. A job is more than just a means to an end: In fact, we have an opportunity to make jobs a “pathway” to income and employment security. Many precariously employed people have a hard time moving into better opportunities—partly because there is no provision for preventing different treatment of workers based on employment relationship or hours of work in the Employment Standards Act. Employment reform can help people build futures that are strong, secure and prosperous by eliminating this disparity in compensation.

4. It’s good for business: Changes in the labour market aren’t just hurting people—they’re increasingly seen as having a negative effect on businesses. When people have unpredictable lives, they’re not engaged in their work and they also make more errors, according to Zeynep Ton, an adjunct associate professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management who has researched the topic extensively. However, we also know that when businesses invest in the security of their workforces, there tends to be less turnover and higher productivity. The bottom line? Good jobs aren’t just good for employees and communities, they’re good for business too. That’s why United Way Toronto & York Region has signed on to the Better Way to Build the Economy Alliance—a coalition of organizations from the community sector, private sector and labour. The Alliance has put together a compelling website to share the secret to a key success of several local employers: an investment in decent work. 

5. It’s good for communities: We know from our research that precarious employment traps people in a cycle that can be hard to break free from. This impacts individual lives—but it also impacts their communities. Workers who are precariously employed often delay starting families and are less likely to volunteer or give back to their community. There are economic and social consequences for the neighbourhoods where these people live.

We look forward to the upcoming conversation around employment reform, which represents the next major step to strengthening our economy by enabling a dynamic, engaged and productive workforce.

UPDATE: What is the precarity penalty?

Our guest blogger this week is Michelynn Laflèche, United Way Toronto & York Region’s Director of Research, Public Policy and Evaluation. Prior to joining United Way, she worked as a consultant with Civic Action and was Chief Executive of the Runnymede Trust, a leading social policy and research charity in the UK.

Michelynn Lafleche

Michelynn Laflèche
Director, Research, Public Policy and Evaluation
United Way Toronto & York Region

Job precarity is having a negative impact on the wellbeing of our residents—it’s something we’ve been talking about in our research for some time now.

What we’ve discovered in our newly released report, The Precarity Penalty: Executive Summary York Region is that this issue is widespread across York Region.  In fact, more than 40% of workers are in jobs with some degree of insecurity.

York Region—a place many consider affluent—is not immune to the problems facing Toronto’s downtown.

Our data tells us that people’s anxiety about work is interfering with their personal and family lives. More than half of the people surveyed earning low or middle incomes are experiencing this type of anxiety. The uncertainty of not knowing if and when you’ll work can be socially isolating.

Precarity-Penalty-YR-Bucket 3Not having access to childcare is another huge challenge for York Region residents—63.6% say it interferes with their work-life. How do you schedule your child’s daycare if your work schedule changes weekly or daily?

These challenges are real and significant, but they don’t paint the entire picture.  We also learned that in some instances, York Region residents actually fare better. Based on the sample size, we can’t draw definitive conclusions, but can make some interesting comparisons. We found that York Region residents who are precariously employed earn 10% higher individual incomes and 7% have higher household income.

All of this data is another important step in guiding and informing our work.  It underscores the need to address the growing issues that surround precarious employment and our commitment to do more.

And we are prepared to do more around this work with the help of our partners across all sectors. We’re committed to building a dynamic labour market, ensuring jobs are a pathway to employment and enhancing social supports for a new and improved labour market.

3 things you made possible in 2015

IAC_Home-Page_Blog_Good-to-knowIt’s almost 2016!  As the year draws to a close, we wanted to say a big thank you to each of you who work hard every single day to help change lives and create possibility for tens of thousands of people across Toronto and York Region.

Here’s a recap of 3 things you helped make possible in 2015:

  1. A future that works: Precarious, or insecure, employment affects more than 40% of people in the Hamilton-GTA. With the support of people like you—who care about the big issues—we were able to further our research and delve deeper into this vital socioeconomic problem. We released The Precarity Penalty last March and convened partners from across the province to discuss solutions for a labour market that works. And the best part? By shining a spotlight on this important issue, individual lives are changing for the better. Angel Reyes, for example, spent years working in precarious, or insecure, temp positions and dealing with the daily, harsh realities of living on a low income. When he was laid off from his most recent job earlier this year, he worried about making ends meet. But there’s a happy ending to this story. After sharing his journey with the Toronto Star, the 61-year-old was inundated with messages of support. The Star reports Angel has since found a permanent, unionized job and a new, subsidized apartment. “My intention is justice,” Angel told the Star. “Not just for me. It’s for the many, many workers in Ontario and Canada and the world who are living in circumstances like me.”

  1. Historic legislation for communities: Heard of Bill 6? This new law—passed by the Ontario government on June 4, 2015—brings benefits such as employment and apprenticeship to young people in the same communities where it works. You played a key role in bringing Community Benefits to fruition, which includes large infrastructure projects like the Eglinton Crosstown line. We’re proud to be part of this initiative that connects residents in priority neighbourhoods with skills training, community supports—and jobs with a future.

IAC_Home-Page_Blog_Community-Benefits

  1. A roadmap to help end poverty: TO Prosperity—Toronto’s first-ever anti-poverty plan—was unanimously passed by city council on November 4, 2015. This historic initiative sets a 20-year goal for tackling growing inequality and improving access to opportunity. It promises good jobs and living wages, more affordable housing, expanded transit in the inner suburbs, and better access to community services. United Way is proud to have played a key role in shaping this groundbreaking strategy, thanks to your support.

CityHall