The workplace has changed…

Our guest bloggers this week are Daniele Zanotti, President & CEO of United Way Toronto & York Region and Elizabeth Mulholland, CEO of the national charity, Prosper Canada.

Growing income volatility is causing tough financial challenges and mounting stress for millions of Canadians, according to a new report by TD Bank Group. TD’s research found that unpredictable and variable income is associated with lower overall financial health for those affected, as well as lower financial confidence and increased financial stress.

Income fluctuations are tied to the rise of precarious employment in the changing labour market, as highlighted in United Way Toronto and York Region’s ongoing research. It shows that nearly half of all workers in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA) are facing this new reality of precarious work. These workers are more likely to experience irregular income, suffer more anxiety, and have more difficulty making ends meet. This, in turn, undermines their family, work and social relationships and overall quality of life.

While the labour market has changed, our employment laws and income security policies have been slow to adapt. Most of these policies were developed at a time when standard, full-time permanent jobs were the norm, and they haven’t undergone major changes since.

A changing labour market doesn’t have to be a bad thing. To make it work for everyone though, we need a coordinated response by government, labour, employers and community organizations to ensure that those who are most vulnerable receive the supports and protections they need and policies are in place to mitigate negative impacts on people, households, businesses and communities.

This is why the Government of Ontario’s imminent response to the Changing Workplaces Review Final Report is so timely and critical. Keeping our labour markets dynamic and flexible, while also supporting people engaged in non-standard employment, requires new policy and institutional approaches.

Finding the right balance between competitiveness and job stability, and between the needs of employers and workers will not be easy. But Canadian employers have shown interest in learning more about the impacts of this new reality for their workers and are already engaged in discussions with organizations like United Way, KPMG and Prosper Canada to understand how businesses can also contribute to and benefit from a more secure workforce.

We are at an important crossroads for Ontario and leadership from all sectors is critical to building the momentum and support needed to modernize our employment standards and practices. If we can build consensus, work together, and move forward with purpose, we can get at the root causes of growing income volatility and reduce its financial and human toll on individuals, families, communities and our economy.

We look forward to the Government of Ontario’s proposed legislation later this year and a thoughtful, balanced agenda that builds inclusive prosperity for all Ontarians. With the right policies, we can help our businesses to thrive, while also enabling Ontarians to achieve the financial stability they seek and the ability, once again, to plan for and invest in the future they want for themselves and their families.

It will take all of us working together to develop a labour market that works for everyone, and we encourage the provincial government to exercise its leadership on this issue and set Ontario on the right course.

3 tips for leading philanthropic change at your company

Our guest blogger this week is James Temple, Chief Corporate Responsibility Officer at PwC Canada. He provides oversight to ways the firm is embedding social, environmental and economic integrity into the fabric of its business. In 2012, he was named one of the world’s top CSR practitioners by the Centre for Sustainability and Excellence and was an inaugural Notable.ca Young Professional of the Year. He has also been featured in articles and videos for TED, the Globe and Mail, Forbes, Strategy Magazine and Canadian Business. In this Imagine a City post, he gives us tips on how you can lead philanthropic change at your company.

James Temple
Chief Corporate Responsibility Officer
PwC Canada

Our region is home to corporate citizens who are leading innovation across all sectors of our economy. But today’s corporate leaders are about much more than advancing bottom lines, they’re also the engines that drive community building and social change by harnessing the passion and leadership capabilities of their work forces from the inside, out.

As organizational structures evolve, so do the demands of savvy employee brand ambassadors. The landscape of philanthropy and employee fundraising is changing and we need to make a business case for strengthening knowledge and leadership through workplace philanthropy.

Here are a few leading practices that can help you adapt to philanthropic movements within your business:

1. Make philanthropy real and make it relatable 

Each of us can play a role in helping to re-imagine and align philanthropic efforts with our organization’s purpose and your values. Don’t be afraid to share stories about how your personal engagement in philanthropy aligns with your values and has had a positive impact on your leadership journey.

By building community capabilities into your personal brand, you can help to teach others how philanthropy can support better relationship management with teams and clients, enhancing trust between and across teams, the business and community. Philanthropy is accessible and it’s personal.

2. Re-frame conversations around community impact versus dollars raised

There is significant public interest in charitable transparency and increased scrutiny on the amount of money that charities are allocating towards fundraising and administration. We need to find a better proxy to help build trust between employee donors and community agencies who need funding to keep the lights on to do their work.

Studies suggest that people respond better to measures that focus on social impacts—for example, how many lives have been saved as a direct result of donations, or how many children get a healthy breakfast as a direct result of funding a meal program. By communicating progress in this way, we take the pressure of the balance sheet and can go well beyond the ‘fundraising thermometer’ to help rationalize why people should join a community movement.

3. Provide options that make room for time, talent and treasure

People can give back in many ways and effective corporate citizens make room for people to give in a way that’s right for them. Every contribution counts. From empowering people to volunteer to learn more about how a community organization makes a difference, to looking for ways to help people share their professional skills pro-bono, the value of a contribution can be amplified by helping people choose which options are the optimal mix for their personal circumstances. What’s most important? Creating momentum and personal ownership so a person believes they can be the change that they are a part of.

Want to learn more about how PwC and other leading corporate citizens are blazing a trail when it comes to philanthropy in the workplace? Visit United Way’s Keeping Good Company website and follow PwC and United Way on May 16 when PwC will be hosting a conversation in partnership with United Way at the Economic Club of Canada that digs into this very topic.

5 tips for teens on getting volunteer-ready

It’s National Volunteer Week! This year, we’ve put together a “cheat sheet” for Ontario high school students who are required to complete 40 hours of community service before they graduate. If you’re a parent, we hope you’ll share our tips list with your teen for everything they need to know on getting “volunteer-ready.”

CamaraChambers

Camara Chambers
Director, Community Engagement
Volunteer Toronto

1. Start early: It’s never too early to start thinking about your volunteer service. In Ontario, students can start clocking their community service hours starting right after they finish Grade 8 and all the way up until, and including, Grade 12. It often takes several weeks to secure a volunteer position, so it’s best not to leave it to the last minute, especially if you’re close to graduation. “If you have to squeeze all of those 40 hours into two weeks, you’re going to be setting yourself up for failure,” says Camara Chambers, Director of Community Engagement at Volunteer Toronto. “A great time to start volunteering is during the spring when the annual ChangeTheWorld: Youth Volunteering Challenge takes place. Since you can’t volunteer during school hours, many students choose to complete their hours during the summer or even March Break. Volunteering at a number of events is another popular option since it gives young people the chance to split their volunteer hours into smaller chunks of time. “It’s also a great opportunity to try different roles, meet lots of different people and get a behind the scenes look at lots of different events throughout the city,” adds Chambers.

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2. Do your homework: It’s important to find an opportunity that’s a good match for your personality, skills and future career aspirations. Chambers advises all volunteers to narrow their search using the “3 Rs”— reflect, research and reach out. What do you really want to get out of the experience? Maybe you’re focused on getting some valuable experience for your resume. Or perhaps you want to put a particular skill to good use. Are you interested in working with a particular group of people or on a specific issue such as poverty? Or maybe you just need to find a position that fits into your busy schedule and is close to home or school. Knowing what you want will help you narrow your search once you’re ready. It’s also a good idea to talk to your school guidance counsellor to get pre-approval on your position. “Some schools are more flexible than others and will allow you to volunteer just helping your neighbour,” says Chambers. “Others will want you to do it specifically for a non-profit or a charity.” It’s also important to know your rights. You should expect to have the role clearly explained to you and receive some form of training, even if it’s informal. Having a supervisor or adult mentor is another must. Remember that you can’t be paid for your volunteer service but some organizations provide tokens or small honorariums.

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3. Find a role that fits: You’re ready to start your search. The best place to look? Online volunteer databases such as volunteertoronto.ca or yorkinfo.ca that list hundreds of opportunities organized by age and category. If you can’t find what you’re looking for here, you can also contact individual organizations to learn more about any positions that might be available. Talk to your parents and peers for suggestions, or contact your local place of worship or a charity in your neighbourhood.  Don’t forget to factor your personality into the equation. If you’re not comfortable in big groups, choose a role such as one-on-one tutoring. You can even volunteer with your friends at certain fundraising events. Family volunteering opportunities are also available and include delivering meals to seniors. Once you’ve secured your spot, it’s not unusual to complete a brief in-person or phone interview to learn more about the position. Some roles may even require that you attend an information session or day of training.

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4. Put your best foot forward: Although you can’t be paid for your volunteer service, treat this opportunity as a valuable learning experience for the future. “It’s really important to leave a good impression. That means turning up on time, asking lots of questions when you don’t understand your responsibilities and communicating honestly especially if you’re not finding the job enjoyable,”says Chambers. “These people will likely be your reference in the future.” She adds: “If you make a really good impression, your volunteer supervisor will probably introduce you to other people, give you other opportunities or give you more of a leadership role.” And finally, don’t forget to say “thank you” once you’ve completed your position.
CamaraChambers

5. Become a better citizen (and have fun doing it!): Completing your mandatory 40 hours of volunteer service is about much more than just clocking time. If you want to get the most out of your experience, be prepared to learn. Engage with your peers and supervisor to learn more about the issues facing the organization—and the sector—where you’ve selected your position. When you’re done, stay in touch with any friends or contacts you’ve made along the way. “Volunteering is a fantastic way to try new experiences, meet new people and make new friends,” says Chambers. Maybe you’ll even find something you want to stick with over the long-term.”

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