Federal budget: Crunching the numbers for our community

Pedro Barata
Senior Vice President, Strategic Initiatives & Public Affairs United Way Toronto & York Region

Our guest blogger this week is Pedro Barata, Senior Vice President of Strategic Initiatives & Public Affairs at United Way Toronto & York Region. He has experience working within, and across community-based organizations, strategic philanthropy, and various levels of government.

Annual budgets are always anticipated events, because they offer a government’s blueprint for how it plans to raise and spend funds—for health, education, transit and so many other things that we as citizens rely on. They are also policy documents, announcing and hinting at new government policies with respect to taxes, strategy development and investments.

The 2017 federal budget was especially top of mind, since the government had raised expectations on addressing the growing crisis of housing affordability across our country.

Here’s our take, as it relates to our work, and the future and prosperity of our community.

While investments in early learning fall short of what is currently required, this year’s budget did make a historic commitment to housing, childcare and skills development for youth. Building on 2016’s game-changing down-payment on a Canada Child Benefit—helping to lift thousands of kids out of poverty—this year’s budget also announced more than $11 billion (on top of the $2 billion from last year) to address homelessness and housing affordability.

Many of the proposals in this budget respond to ideas generated by the National Housing Collaborative (NHC). Convened by United Way Toronto & York Region, the NHC is a Canada-wide action group that has brought housing advocates, foundations, government agencies, and developers and landlords together to reach consensus on practical solutions to housing affordability. United Way is particularly encouraged by the creation of a $5-billion National Housing Fund, which will spur local solutions to systemic barriers to housing affordability. It will also prompt new investment models for our tower-renewal work within priority neighbourhoods.

We are equally excited to see investments in child-care spaces. Our work has shown that low-income households—and those affected by precarious employment—face a greater risk of choosing between a job and caring for their children.

Finally, youth facing multiple barriers, including poverty, racism and mental health, are more likely to have difficulty accessing tools and training for a successful career. We see it as smart public policy for the government to expand the Youth Employment Strategy in this year’s budget, with supports for at-risk populations. United Way’s Youth Success Strategy seeks to serve those kids who are farthest from the labour market, and we continue to discuss alignment and evaluation of the two strategies with officials in the federal government.

Our world is characterized by uncertain times, and it is very encouraging to see our federal government cast a vision—and lay the groundwork—for collaboration with United Way and other organizations. With that, we have the promise of growth, progress and systemic change to make our communities stronger. And our future that much brighter.

Changemakers to watch: Hadley Nelles

Everyone deserves a safe, affordable place to call home. For Hadley Nelles, it’s this rallying cry and commitment to social justice that inspires her to work to tackle our city’s affordable housing crisis. In 2015, more than 82,400 individuals and families in Toronto found themselves waiting for affordable housing—with an average wait time of over eight years. Driven by skyrocketing rental rates and dwindling vacancies, it’s a crisis that won’t go away without community conveners like Hadley. She believes passionately (with the research to back her up) that a home is the foundation of a good life and a gateway to stability, security and opportunities that put people on the path to a better life.

WHO: Hadley helps spearhead affordable housing work across Toronto as Housing Initiatives Lead at Maytree, a foundation dedicated to advancing solutions to poverty. She’s also been a pivotal player in a number of other housing projects including the United Way-led National Housing Collaborative—a group of partners that help put policy into action so that people with all levels of income can find a suitable home, while also having a choice in their housing. She also co-launched an ideas incubator in the heart of Regent Park that helps community innovators tackle complex social issues like poverty and unemployment.

WHY: “Housing is essential for building healthy, productive lives and a key ingredient to strong communities,” says Hadley. “When we help people access affordable housing and strengthen community connections, neighbourhoods become more inclusive and resilient.” Hadley’s passion for making a difference, as well as her skills as a highly-effective partnership broker, is leading to real results in the housing sector. One of the secrets to her success? “Collaboration is key,” she says. “A big part of my job is working with individuals, organizations and government partners across numerous sectors and communities to look for durable solutions to affordable housing and poverty.” One example? She’s currently helping to guide the Tower Renewal Partnership. Funded and co-led by United Way—and informed by our research—the project aims to transform aging apartment towers in the inner suburbs—often in dire need of repair—into more affordable, livable and vibrant places to reside for people living on a low income. This includes giving high-rise communities more control over local development—bringing jobs, shops and services to neighbourhoods that need them most. Hadley is also making sure the voices of residents are being heard loud and clear. “Sustainable solutions come to light when we engage residents in the decision-making process,” she says. In fact, just this past year, Maytree partnered with United Way to convene conversations with residents to help inform Canada’s National Housing Strategy. “New forms of social policy, like advocating for a housing benefit that can support folks in their affordability gap, play an important part in achieving our goal.”

WHAT’S NEXT: With Hadley and the Partnership continuing to roll out renewal projects in Toronto and Hamilton, they’re looking for new collaborators that can broaden the scope of their work across the GTHA; their goal is to create even more on-the-ground “showcases” that demonstrate the benefits of keeping housing affordable and sustainable—for residents, developers and entire neighbourhoods. Maytree is also supporting housing advocates across the city to protect everyone’s right to housing. In Parkdale, for example, they’re working to keep the ever-evolving neighbourhood diverse and affordable.

What if you could turn a parking lot into a community garden?

What if you could turn an unused parking lot into a community garden?

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Pretty cool, right? That’s the idea behind a recent bylaw called Residential Apartment Commercial (RAC) zoning that will give high-rise tower communities in priority neighbourhoods greater control over local development.

Why does it matter? Because in addition to creating opportunities to bring in new jobs, shops and services,  RAC zoning can also help to transform tower neighbourhoods into vibrant, livable and walkable communities.

United Way was proud to play a key role in bringing this new legislation to fruition by working with partners, including the City of Toronto and ERA Architects.

Watch this video to hear more from our very own Pedro Barata, VP, Communications and Public Affairs, on what’s next for this exciting initiative.